Commercial building HVAC inspection, rooftop Gainesville Florida

How we inspect your gainesville commercial property

The process to inspect a commercial property in Gainesville, Florida begins simply with a conversation or email about your inspection needs. Generally, clients reach out to us when they are purchasing a commercial property or if they want assistance in determining the condition of a property they currently own. For smaller commercial buildings such as non-big-box storefronts, small offices, or restaurants, we are typically able to provide a services proposal and quote quickly once we verify the size and location online. For larger commercial properties in Gainesville we are asked to inspect, the process of providing an accurate services proposal and quote is more complex.

Providing an inspection services proposal

An inspection services proposal is a document or email we provide to you that details the scope of the inspection, the fees, the timelines, and how and when you will receive the final report. While discussing your initial request with you we will request the property address and ask if there are any specific areas of concern you have or areas you are not interested in having inspected. After that, we will begin a reconnaissance review of the property online and possibly in-person. For properties that will require bringing in trade professionals we generally ask to see the property in-person to obtain photos of the equipment on site to relay to our preferred trade partners. This allows them to get an accurate idea of the equipment they will be responsible for an can make recommendations to the scope of services and fees. Once completed, we will provide a written proposal to you via email. If a site visit is not required we generally are able to provide proposals within 24 hours.

Scheduling the on-site assessment

Once you approve the inspection services proposal and return the signed inspection agreement and deposit (if required), we will begin scheduling with our trade partners. Generally, when providing a proposal, we will include a window of time to perform the on-site assessment. This allow us to coordinate with our trade partners, realtors, and tenants, to ensure all parties are available and accommodating on the identified inspection date(s). For large properties such as multi-story office buildings, more than one day may be required to perform the assessment. We generally also provide a rain-out day in the event large areas of the property cannot be inspected due to weather conditions.

Researching the property history

As part of our inspection process, we always perform a history research of the property. This allows us to get a clear picture of what to expect at the on-site assessment, and what systems and components may require additional attention due to age or documented repairs. Research can include a review of the property appraiser’s information, tax collector’s information, building permit history, and GIS overlays to identify land contours, drainage pathways, and flood zone areas.

Additionally, we may request a variety of documentation pertinent to the property from the current owner to help in identifying when systems and components have been updated, utilities usages to identify spikes and dips. A review of the due diligence documentation can also identify patterns in the maintenance and upkeep practices of the property. All findings from the documentation research are relayed in the final report.

On-Site Inspection of the commercial property

The on-site assessment of the property is performed at the date(s) and time(s) agreed to by all parties that will be affected. It is our goal never to disrupt the operations of an active business. We will always inspect your Gainesville commercial property to the standards outlined by the State of Florida Administrative Rule governing licensed inspectors as well as the Standards of Practice outlined by the Certified Commercial Property Inspector’s Association which can be found here: ccpia.org/sop. During the on-site assessment, we will be reviewing the condition and functionality of hundreds of systems and components as will any trade partners we choose to bring in to assist. Safety is of key priority to not only the tenants and operating businesses and owners but also to the patrons and guests. Where possible we will test all available and accessible systems in a manner that does not impact the business operations to any significant extent. Areas that are reviewed during the on-site assessment of your commercial property include:

Roof

  • the roof covering;
  • the presence of exposed membrane;
  • slopes;
  • for evidence of significant ponding;
  • the gutters;
  • the downspouts;
  • the vents, flashings, skylights, chimney and other roof penetrations;
  • the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs; and
  • for the need for repairs.

Plumbing

  • and verify the presence of and identify the location of the main water shut-off valve to each building;
  • and verify the presence of a back-flow prevention device if, in the inspector’s opinion, a cross-connection could occur between the water-distribution system and non-potable water or private source;
  • the water-heating equipment, including combustion air, venting, connections, energy-source supply systems, and seismic bracing, and verify the presence or absence of temperature-/pressure-relief valves and/or Watts 210 valves;
  • and flush a representative number of toilets;
  • and water-test a representative number of sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
  • and verify that hinged shower doors open outward from the shower, and have safety glass-conformance stickers or indicators;
  • the interior water supply, including a representative number of fixtures and faucets;
  • the drain, waste and vent systems, including a representative number of fixtures;
  • and describe any visible fuel-storage systems;
  • and test sump pumps with accessible floats;
  • and describe the water supply, drain, waste and main fuel shut-off valves, as well as the location of the water main and main fuel shut-off valves;
  • and determine whether the water supply is public or private;
  • the water supply by viewing the functional flow in several fixtures operated simultaneously, and report any deficiencies as in need of repair;
  • and report as in need of repair deficiencies in installation and identification of hot and cold faucets;
  • and report as in need of repair mechanical drain stops that are missing or do not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs;
  • and report as in need of repair commodes that have cracks in the ceramic material, are improperly mounted on the floor, leak, or have tank components that do not operate; and
  • piping support.

Life Safety

  • inspect fire access roads and report on any obstructions or overhead wires lower than 13 feet and 6 inches;
  • inspect the address or street number to determine whether it is visible from the street, with numbers in contrast to their background;
  • inspect to determine whether a 3-foot clear space exists around the circumference of fire hydrants;
  • verify that hinged shower doors open outward from the shower and have safety glass-conformance stickers or indicators;
  • inspect to determine whether the storage of flammable and combustible materials is orderly, separated from heaters by distance or shielding so that ignition cannot occur, and not stored in exits, boiler rooms, mechanical rooms or electrical equipment rooms;
  • inspect to determine whether a “No Smoking” sign is posted in areas where flammable or combustible material is stored, dispensed or used;
  • inspect for the presence of fire alarm systems;
  • inspect for alarm panel accessibility;
  • inspect for the presence of portable extinguishers, and determine whether they are located in conspicuous and readily available locations immediately available for use, and not obstructed or obscured from view;
  • inspect to determine whether a portable fire extinguisher is stored within a 30-foot travel distance of commercial-type cooking equipment that uses cooking oil or animal fat;
  • inspect to determine whether manual-actuation devices for commercial cooking appliances exist near the means of egress from the cooking area, 42 to 48 inches above the floor and 10 and 20 feet away, and clearly identifying the hazards protected;
  • inspect to determine whether the maximum travel distance to a fire extinguisher is 75 feet;
  • inspect for the presence of sprinkler systems, and determine if they were ever painted other than at the factory;
  • inspect for the presence of emergency lighting systems;
  • inspect for exit signs at all exits, and inspect for independent power sources, such as batteries;
  • inspect for the presence of directional signs where an exit location is not obvious;
  • inspect for the presence of signs over lockable exit doors stating: “This Door Must Remain Unlocked During Business Hours”;
  • inspect for penetrations in any walls or ceilings that separate the exit corridors or stairwells from the rest of the building;
  • inspect for fire-separation doors that appear to have been blocked or wedged open, or that do not automatically close and latch;
  • inspect exit stairwell handrails;
  • inspect for exit trip hazards;
  • inspect for the presence of at least two exits to the outside, or one exit that has a maximum travel distance of 75 feet;
  • inspect exit doorways to determine that they are less than 32 inches in clear width;
  • inspect to determine whether the exit doors were locked from the inside, chained, bolted, barred, latched or otherwise rendered unusable at the time of the inspection;
  • inspect to determine whether the exit doors swing open in the direction of egress travel; and
  • inspect the storage to determine if it is potentially obstructing access to fire hydrants, fire extinguishers, alarm panels or electric panelboards, or if it is obstructing aisles, corridors, stairways or exit doors, or if it is within 18 inches of sprinkler heads, or if it is within 3 feet of heat-generating appliances or electrical panelboards.

Exterior

  • the siding, flashing and trim;
  • all exterior doors, decks, stoops, steps, stairs, porches, railings, eaves, soffits and fascia;
  • and report as in need of repair any safety issues regarding intermediate balusters, spindles or rails for steps, stairways, balconies and railings;
  • a representative number of windows;
  • the vegetation, surface drainage, and retaining walls when these are likely to adversely affect the structure;
  • the exterior for accessibility barriers;
  • the storm water drainage system;
  • the general topography;
  • the parking areas;
  • the sidewalks;
  • exterior lighting;
  • the landscaping;
  • and determine that a 3-foot clear space exists around the circumference of fire hydrants;
  • and describe the exterior wall covering.

Heating and Ventilation

  • multiple gas meter installations, such as a building with multiple tenant spaces, and verify that each meter is clearly and permanently identified with the respective space supplied;
  • the heating systems using normal operating controls, and describe the energy source and heating method;
  • and report as in need of repair heating systems that do not operate;
  • and report if the heating systems are deemed inaccessible;
  • and verify that a permanent means of access, with permanent ladders and/or catwalks, are present for equipment and appliances on roofs higher than 16 feet;
  • and verify the presence of level service platforms for appliances on roofs with a slope of 25% or greater;
  • and verify that luminaire and receptacle outlets are provided at or near the appliance;
  • and verify that the system piping appears to be sloped to permit the system to be drained;
  • for connectors, tubing and piping that might be installed in a way that exposes them to physical damage;
  • wood framing with cutting, notching or boring that might cause a structural or safety issue;
  • pipe penetrations in concrete and masonry building elements to verify that they are sleeved;
  • exposed gas piping for identification by a yellow label marked “Gas” in black letters occurring at intervals of 5 feet or less;
  • and determine if any appliances or equipment with ignition sources are located in public, private, repair or parking garages or fuel-dispensing facilities;
  • and verify that fuel-fired appliances are not located in or obtain combustion air from sleeping rooms, bathrooms, storage closets or surgical rooms;
  • for the presence of exhaust systems in occupied areas where there is a likelihood of excess heat, odors, fumes, spray, gas, noxious gases or smoke;
  • and verify that outdoor air-intake openings are located at least 10 feet away from any hazardous or noxious contaminant sources, such as vents, chimneys, plumbing vents, streets, alleys, parking lots or loading docks;
  • outdoor exhaust outlets for the likelihood that they may cause a public nuisance or fire hazard due to smoke, grease, gases, vapors or odors;
  • for the potential of flooding or evidence of past flooding that could cause mold in ductwork or plenums; and
  • condensate drains.

Attic Ventilation and Insulation

  • the insulation in unfinished spaces;
  • the ventilation of attic spaces;
  • mechanical ventilation systems;
  • and report on the general absence or lack of insulation.

Doors, Windows and Interior

  • open and close a representative number of doors and windows;
  • inspect the walls, ceilings, steps, stairways and railings;
  • inspect garage doors and garage door-openers;
  • inspect interior steps, stairs and railings;
  • inspect all loading docks;
  • ride all elevators and escalators;
  • and report as in need of repair any windows that are obviously fogged or display other evidence of broken seals.

Cooking Area

  • verify that all smoke- or grease-laden, vapor-producing cooking equipment, such as deep-fat fryers, ranges, griddles, broilers and woks, is equipped with an exhaust system;
  • inspect for the accessibility for cleaning and inspection of the exhaust system’s interior surface;
  • inspect for grease buildup;
  • verify that hoods are made of steel or stainless steel;
  • verify that visible grease filters are arranged so that all exhaust air passes through them;
  • verify that visible sections of exhaust ducts are not interconnected with any other ventilation system;
  • verify that visual sections of exhaust ducts are installed without dips or traps that might collect residue;
  • verify that exhaust ducts do not appear to pass through firewalls;
  • try to verify that exhaust ducts lead directly to the exterior of the building;
  • try to verify that exterior exhaust outlets do not discharge into walkways, or create a nuisance, in the opinion of the inspector;
  • inspect to determine that a portable fire extinguisher is stored within a 30-foot travel distance of commercial-type cooking equipment that uses cooking oil or animal fat; and
  • inspect to determine that manual-actuation devices for commercial cooking appliances exist near the means of egress from the cooking area, 42 and 48 inches above the floor and 10 to 20 feet away, and clearly identifying the hazards protected.

Wood Decks and Balconies

  • with the unaided eye, for deck and balcony members that are noticeably out of level or out of plumb;
  • for visible decay;
  • for paint failure and buckling;
  • for nail pullout (nail pop);
  • for fastener rust, iron stain and corrosion;
  • and verify that flashing was installed on the deck-side of the ledger board;
  • for vertical members (posts) that have exposed end-grains;
  • for obvious trip hazards;
  • for non-graspable handrails;
  • railings for height less than the 36-inch minimum*;
  • guardrails and infill for openings that exceed the 4-inch maximum*;
  • open-tread stairs for openings that exceed the 4⅜-inch maximum*;
  • the triangular area between guardrails and stairways for openings that exceed the 6-inch maximum*;
  • built-up and multi-ply beam spans for butt joints;
  • for notches in the middle-third of solid-sawn wood spans;
  • for large splits longer than the depths of their solid-sawn wood members;
  • for building egresses blocked, covered or hindered by deck construction; and
  • for the possibility of wetting from gutters, downspouts or sprinklers.

Cooling

  • multiple air-conditioning compressor installations, such as a building with multiple tenant spaces, and verify that each compressor is clearly and permanently identified with the respective space supplied;
  • the central cooling equipment using normal operating controls;
  • and verify that luminaire and receptacle outlets are provided at or near the appliance;
  • and verify that a permanent means of access, with permanent ladders and/or catwalks, are present for equipment and appliances on roofs higher than 16 feet;
  • and verify the presence of level service platforms for appliances on roofs with a slope of 25% or greater;
  • wood framing with cutting, notching or boring that might cause a structural or safety issue;
  • pipe penetrations in concrete and masonry building elements to verify that they are sleeved;
  • piping support;
  • for connectors, tubing and piping that might be installed in a way that exposes them to physical damage;
  • for the potential of flooding or evidence of past flooding that could cause mold in ductwork and plenums; and
  • condensate drains.

Electrical

  • the service drop/lateral;
  • the meter socket enclosures;
  • the service-entrance conductors, and report on any noted deterioration of the conductor insulation or cable sheath;
  • the means for disconnecting the service main;
  • the service-entrance equipment, and report on any noted physical damage, overheating or corrosion;
  • and determine the rating of the service disconnect amperage, if labeled;
  • panelboards and over-current devices, and report on any noted physical damage, overheating, corrosion, or lack of accessibility or working space (minimum 30 inches wide, 36 inches deep, and 78 inches high in front of panel) that would hamper safe operation, maintenance or inspection;
  • and report on any unused circuit-breaker panel openings that are not filled;
  • and report on absent or poor labeling;
  • the service grounding and bonding;
  • a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be AFCI-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible. Although a visual inspection, the removal of faceplates or other covers or luminaires (fixtures) to identify suspected hazards is permitted;
  • and report on any noted missing or damaged faceplates or box covers;
  • and report on any noted open junction boxes or open wiring splices;
  • and report on any noted switches and receptacles that are painted;
  • and test all ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) receptacles and GFCI circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible;
  • and report the presence of solid-conductor aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
  • and report on any tested GFCI receptacles in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not installed properly or did not operate properly, any evidence of arcing or excessive heat, or where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall;
  • and report the absence of smoke detectors;
  • and report on the presence of flexible cords being improperly used as substitutes for the fixed wiring of a structure or running through walls, ceilings, floors, doorways, windows, or under carpets.

Basement, Foundation and Crawlspace

  • the basement;
  • the foundation;
  • the crawlspace;
  • the visible structural components;
  • and report on the location of under-floor access openings;
  • and report any present conditions or clear indications of active water penetration observed by the inspector;
  • for wood in contact with or near soil;
  • and report any general indications of foundation movement that are observed by the inspector, such as, but not limited to: sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, or floor slopes;
  • and report on any cutting, notching or boring of framing members that may present a structural or safety concern.

Fireplaces

  • fireplaces, and open and close the damper doors, if readily accessible and operable;
  • hearth extensions and other permanently installed components;
  • and report as in need of repair deficiencies in the lintel, hearth or material surrounding the fireplace, including clearance from combustible materials.

Post on-site assessment research

Once the on-site assessment is completed, the next step is to review the finding and conduct research and literature reviews of an issues that require further investigation. Examples of necessary research include, reviewing manufacturer documentation regarding installation and maintenance requirements, review of literature on components the inspector is not familiar with, review the findings provided by the trade partners and conduct backup informational research, etc. The post-assessment research portion can take anywhere from an hour to a few days depending on the finds and specialized systems found on the property. This review helps us better inspect your Gainesville commercial property by providing key insight into specialized systems and components and providing documentation references for findings that may not be common knowledge to other trade professionals. Typically, post-assessment research portion is conducted while performing the report generation process as issues are reviewed to be reported on.

Providing the report for your Gainesville commercial Property Inspection

The written proposal provided at the beginning of this process outlines the timelines and methods in which your report will be delivered. We always deliver reports through email as PDF documents so to track the delivery of the report to ensure it reached your inbox. Once the report is delivered, we are available to answer any questions or discuss the report in detail either over the phone, by email, or in person. It is our goal that you fully understand your report as it relates to the condition if your commercial property purchase in Gainesville, Florida.

If you have any questions about our process to inspect your commercial property in Gainesville please feel free to reach out to us by phone or email! We’re happy to discuss our process and provide you with full transparency and detail to ensure you understand exactly what hiring a commercial property inspection entails.

Contact

Based In………………Newberry/Gainesville, FL

Phone………………….352 405 5516

Email………..…………..inspections@greenwoodcommercial.com

North Florida Commercial Property Inspection Service Area:

– Gainesville, Lake City, Jacksonville, Ocala, Brooksville, Tallahassee, The Villages, St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra, Dayton Beach, Tampa, Orlando

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